QUADRATICS: Comprehensive Notes and What I Actually Teach

Here are three items on the matters of quadratics:

1.

A COMPREHENSIVE COMPANION GUIDE TO QUADRATICS:
Fresh, Accessible and Human Notes for all who feel they never “got it.”

Quadratics: A Comprehensive Companion Guide

I went through all the content on this topic covered in several international curricula and put together here, in one place, my thoughts and approaches to it all! The Table of Contents is overwhelming, but you will see that I believe that only about one-third of it is actually important.

These notes, the majority of matching videos to them, and access to a vast bank of practice problem sets appear here EDFINITY.

2.

A CHAPTER ON QUADRATICS: Just the Notes I Choose to Teach

Chapter Notes

This is the subset of the Comprehensive Notes that I personally choose to teach, written out as their own, connected, and complete presentation. They give a robust, mathematically rich story and teach all the powerful thinking, which is all this gig really is about. These notes might be easier work through, but most curricula would deem these notes as “incomplete.” (Where is factoring? Why are you downplaying the quadratic formula? Why not call your graphs “parabolas”? See the Comprehensive Notes for that content and my answers to such questions.)

3.

ARE ALL U-SHAPED GRAPHS QUADRATIC?

Here’s the link to a topic I would include in a College Algebra curriculum since it is typically deemed outside of a high-school curriculum (though it really should be explored in high-school too!)

U-Shaped Graphs. See Experience 3 in this link.

(Of course, I do secretly do this with high schoolers!)

  • ON-LINE SHORT COURSES!

    QUADRATICS, Permutations and Combinations, EXPLODING DOTS, and more!

    Written for educators - and their students too! - this website, slowly growing, takes all the content Tanton has developed in his books, videos, and workshops, and organizes it into short, self-contained, and complete, curriculum units proving that mathematics, at all points of the school curriculum, can be joyous, fresh, innovative, rich, deep-thinking, and devoid of any rote doing! Let's teach generations of students to be self-reliant thinkers, willing to flail and to use their common sense to "nut their way" through challenges, to assess and judge results, and to adjust actions to find success. (Great life skills!)

    CHECK OUT: www.gdaymath.com

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